Sir Isaac Newton: Facts and Information

Here are some facts about Sir Isaac Newton.

  • Isaac Newton was an English mathematician, and one of the most influential scientists ever. He created laws on gravitation and motion which would be used for 300 years.
  • Newton was born in Lincolnshire on 25th December 1642. He attended Trinity College, Cambridge where he worked waiting tables, and at the age of 23 developed a mathematical theory that would become infinitesimal calculus.
  • Isaac Newton escaped the effects of the plague in 1665, by being sent home from college for 2 years. During this time, he came up with his theories on gravity, optics and light.
  • Along with the astronomer Edmond Halley, Newton invented a reflecting telescope in 1688, and carried out experiments on the composition of light.
  • He became president of the Royal Mint in 1696 and was knighted in 1705.
  • Apparently, Newton came up with his well known theory of gravity after seeing an apple fall from a tree. An apple tree in the garden of Newton’s birthplace is said to be the one that produced the fruit that inspired him.
  • His most important work was published in 1687. The Mathematical Principles of Natural Philosophy showed how all objects in the universe were affected by gravity in the same way.
  • Isaac Newton was elected as a Member of Parliament in 1689, serving for exactly a year. During that entire time, the only thing he ever said was a request to shut the window.
  • Newton was fascinated by alchemy, the turning of metals into gold. He was also fascinated by The Bible, often trying to find hidden codes or meanings in it.

Isaac Newton

  • Newton has been portrayed in various episodes of Star Trek and Dr. Who. He was also the last person to appear on British £1 notes, from 1978 to 1988.
  • Because Newton was born on December 25th, some people refer to the holiday Newtonmas instead of Christmas. Apples and science themed gifts are popular with followers.

What next? Discover facts about other famous mathematicians.

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