Sherwood Forest: Facts and Information

Here are some facts about Sherwood Forest.

  • Sherwood Forest is famous for being the home of the legendary outlaw, Robin Hood. It is located in the county of Nottinghamshire, and covers just over 1,000 acres.
  • In the 10th century the forest was established as a Royal hunting ground. Only the King and other lucky and wealthy people, such as the Archbishop of York, were allowed to hunt there.
  • The King introduced strict laws against building in the forest, or removing wood. Anyone caught would be fined, put in jail or even killed if they were caught more than once.
  • It was once the largest of almost 100 Royal forests that covered England during medieval times. During the 13th century, about 30 percent of England was forest.
  • Nearby is the village of Edwinstowe, which is listed in the Domesday Book. According to legend, Robin Hood and Maid Marion were married in the village’s 12th century St. Mary’s Church.
  • Robin Hood supposedly hid from the Sheriff of Nottingham in the Major Oak. The huge tree is thought to be at least 800 years old and its trunk measures about 10 metres around.
  • In 2002, the Major Oak was voted Britain’s favourite tree. Metal chains were used to support its large branches during the early 20th century, and it is regularly inspected by tree surgeons.
Major Oak, Sherwood Forest
Major Oak, Sherwood Forest
  • Some areas of Sherwood Forest have become a nature reserve and an important centre for wildlife in recent years. Over 1,400 species of beetles and 200 types of spiders can be found in the forest.
  • The Sherwood Forest arts and crafts centre is in the middle of the forest. It features traditional arts and crafts such as glass making, soap making, jewellery, and wildlife photography.
  • The Robin Hood Festival takes place in Sherwood Forest every summer. It includes archery demonstrations, medieval style music and dancing, jousting and costumed historical characters.

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