Castle Rising: Facts and Information

Here are some facts about Castle Rising.

  • Castle Rising is located in the village of Castle Rising, near King’s Lynn in Norfolk.
  • The castle was constructed by William d’Aubigny II, Earl of Arundel in 1138
  • It was designed to be fortress combined with a hunting lodge. It’s location was not of massive strategic importance, but the site did allow for a large hunting park to be established.
  • In the 12th century, Castle Rising would probably have been mainly accessed by boat via Babingley River.
  • Castle Rising had three baileys and a stone keep. A Norman chapel, already on the site, was protected by the castle’s defences.
  • Castle Rising was the residence of Queen Isabella of France from the early 1330s to her death in 1358.
  • In the 15th and 16th centuries, Castle Rising was owned by the Duchy of Cornwall and became popular as hunting location. Mary Tudor visited the castle during this period.
  • By the early to mid-16th century, Castle Rising was becoming a ruin. The roof had collapsed and floors of the great hall were in disrepair.

Castle Rising

  • In 1544, Henry VIII gave the castle to Thomas Howard, Duke of Norfolk.
  • By 1570, huge rabbit warrens had damaged the castle’s earthworks, and, in time most of the buildings were removed, leaving only the ruined stone keep.
  • In 1822, restoration work was carried out on the stonework of the keep and the ground of the inner keep was stripped to its original level.
  • During the 1970s, archaeological work was carried out on the site.
  • In 1983 English Heritage took over the site. It has been classified as an Ancient Monument under UK law.
  • Castle Rising’s earthworks covered an area of 12 acres.
  • The Norman chapel, located on the north side of the inner bailey. Its roof was made from Roman tiles from local villas.
  • Castle Rising’s stone keep is similar in appearance to the Norman keep of Norwich Castle.
  • There are several carvings of cats throughout Castle Rising. It is thought that this shows a connection to Felix, the First Bishop of East Anglia.

What next? Learn more facts about castles.

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